Runboard.com
You're welcome.
Community logo

User name: Password: Logoff

runboard.com       Register for a free global account (learn about it) | Log in: (), globally (lost password?)


 
Chipmunk Whisperer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: 03894
Posts: 4068
Reply | Quote
The 1938 Hurricane...


Written of Camp Wyanoke—on Wolfeboro Neck—by Irving Vaughan.

"Brad" refers to Mr. Brad Bentley, the son of the Camp Wyanoke founder.

This will appear in the Grunter over a period of several issues. You will be reading it first!

:DUDE:

_______________________

October 12, 1938

It sort of strikes me that fifty years from now it would be interesting to recall the hurricane of September 21st and the subsequent happenings at Wyanoke.

Briefly, the full fury of the storm hit Wolfeboro at about six-forty five p.m. and the damage to the lakes region was almost entirely restricted to trees and forests blown down, with some material damage to buildings where they happened to be in the line of a large tree.

Information about the real damage to northern New England was not well reported in the newspapers as all lines of communication were disrupted for several days, and from many places for as many as ten days. The loss of life in the storm was greatest nearest the ocean and near rivers. In cities the damage was great from a financial point of view and many fine old elms and shade trees were lost – as the inventory of damage became known it was learned that northern New England suffered irreplaceable damage in the millions, billions of feet of lumber leveled in the forests.

September 21, 1938 Wednesday Mr. Bentley and I had been working in the office and were only aware of the fact that the intermittent rain we had been having for several days seemed to be with us again and this time with a strong wind. This was about five-thirty p.m. We left the office and as we noticed that one or two birches had fallen (not at all an unusual thing) we started to walk to Cabintown. We were not at all alarmed and thought that we were just having an unusually high wind. In Cabintown a section of an ancient maple had blown over, carrying with it wires leading from one of the cabins to the camp-fire site. (This old maple was the one used in the early days of the camp as a back for rifle shooting and campers for many years after used to delight in cutting out pieces of lead.)

Mr. Bentley felt then that I should not go down town in my car for dinner as the wind might make driving dangerous. But we did start, he had to go as far as the foot of the hill. As we reached to bottom of the hill, near where his road starts, we noticed a tree across the road, wires down and the road well blocked. He got out, walking in to his cottages. Instead of leaving my car in the road I backed it up the hill and parked in into the center of the baseball field, headed into the wind, south, and then went down the woods path to Pinehurst. Brad was waiting for me there and we left for town in his mother’s car to report the tree down and light and phone wires broken.

It was now about six p.m. and the wind was stronger but the road was clear and we had no difficulty reaching town. We drove out to Charlie Lord’s house to tell him to be sure to come to camp tomorrow with his axe instead of going to Winnemont where the men were painting. I reported the phone and lights out of commission, got the mail and we started back, still believing that this was just a hard wind.


When Brad and I started down Forest Lane we reached a point a little beyond the gravel pits and just before you reach Goodwin Road and a tree was down blocking our way. We left the car off the road in the pits and started down on foot. The full force of the storm hit us as we were on the road; the seriousness of it didn’t alarm us and we thought it was fun to be present at a real ‘blow’ – until, as we were hiking along, seven large pines fell across the road directly in front of us. Our attention was directed to these trees and to avoiding being hit by branches and we failed entirely to notice a telephone pole bearing down on us, brought down by the pull on the wires by the trees. It came closest to Brad who ducked just in time. From that point on we realized that real trouble was in store and I believe there was doubt in both our minds that we would reach Pinehurst safely. On the rest of the way in more than forty trees fell ahead and around us and we kept on, squirming under some, over others, always keeping a watchful eye on wires and other trees about to fall.

We reached the Carry and started in the Bentley road. Part way in we saw lights and found Mr. Bentley’s car parked, motor running, lights on, deserted, and with a tree down in front and in back. A quick glance inside showed [sign in to see URL]’s black bag. We were really alarmed at this point and covered the remaining distance to the cottages quickly.

We found several large ninety foot pines down around the cottages. Mr. and Mrs. Bentley and Mrs. Morrill, [sign in to see URL]’s mother, were all in the Cage and we were much relieved to find them unharmed. When a large pine came down and sliced off a corner of the Pinehurst porch, just a few feet from the kitchen where Mrs. Bentley was preparing supper they thought it was time to vacate and had started in Mr. Bentley’s car for the village. They found the road blocked, started to return and found another tree had come down directly in back of them, so they hurried back to the Cage.

Mr. Bentley felt that with several pines threatening destruction of the building that it might be safer to chance it up the hill through the woods path to the safety of the large Chapel. Mr. Bentley and Brad helped Mrs. Morrill and Mrs. Bentley and I followed – all carrying lanterns. The noise of the wind was terrific and it was pitch dark. Many trees were down, some falling. Fortunately it was so dark we could not see the wavering trees – otherwise we certainly would never have gone on. Mrs. Morrill, who was seventy-two years old and who had not been at all well, was a great sport during all this, made the trip up with hardly a rest, and her own outward courage was stimulating to all of us. Several very large trees were down across the path and it was with some difficulty that we managed to get through. It was with much relief that we made the Chapel where we built a fire in the fireplace.

Mr. and Mrs. Bentley, Brad and Mrs. Morrill stayed in the Chapel for the night. We located some cocoa and cookies and had a make-shift feed. A quarter of a bottle of Canadian Club Rye helped. I finally went to the Guest House, which was undamaged, wrote a couple of letters, and went to bed at about eleven p.m., first taking another trip down the hill with Brad to get a few things, to survey damage and so forth. We found a tree had fallen across Mr. Bentley’s car, damaging it a great deal and many more trees down. The wind was not as strong as before, but still strong enough in gusts to carry more trees over.

September 22, Thursday Mr. Bentley and Brad joined me at about five a.m. and we went to Pinehurst to prepare breakfast and to make plans for getting Mrs. Bentley and Mrs. Morrill down the hill. Trees were down everywhere but at this point we were not surveying damage. In the middle of breakfast Mrs. Bentley appeared and a little later Mrs. Morrill came down, escorted by Brad. At first we had felt that the storm was more or less local but I managed to tune into a radio station with my car radio and discovered that it was wide-spread.

Brad and I left for town on foot, located the car undamaged that we had left the night before on the gravel pit, bought groceries, and found many evidences
of damage along the road. Our own escape the night before seemed more striking as we saw almost every bordering tree down and a dozen or more telephone and light poles. Brad located young Charlie Lord and we brought him back to camp with us with an axe.

...to be continued...

 emoticon
4/10/2013, 9:02 pm Link to this post Send PM to Chipmunk Whisperer
 
WHL Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Posts: 318
Reply | Quote
Re: The 1938 Hurricane...


Interesting story. Good thing the campers weren't there then.

My mother was babysitting just up the road from there when that happened. Can you imagine a kid babysitting during a storm like that?
4/11/2013, 7:13 am Link to this post Send PM to WHL
 
Balloonshopgirl Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Moderator
Global user

Posts: 2128
Reply | Quote
Re: The 1938 Hurricane...


That is wild!

And I can't imagine being a babysitter in a storm like that!

What is the "cage" that is being referred to here...
4/14/2013, 4:42 pm Link to this post Send PM to Balloonshopgirl
 
Chipmunk Whisperer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: 03894
Posts: 4068
Reply | Quote
Re: The 1938 Hurricane...


quote:

Balloonshopgirl wrote:

What is the "cage" that is being referred to here...



I know, and would be happy to tell you, but 90 percent of the time I'm just talking to myself.

 emoticon




4/14/2013, 8:02 pm Link to this post Send PM to Chipmunk Whisperer
 
Balloonshopgirl Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Moderator
Global user

Posts: 2128
Reply | Quote
Re: The 1938 Hurricane...


Keep it up and 100% of the time you'll be talking to yourself.
4/14/2013, 8:25 pm Link to this post Send PM to Balloonshopgirl
 
Chipmunk Whisperer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: 03894
Posts: 4068
Reply | Quote
Re: The 1938 Hurricane...


quote:

Chipmunk Whisperer wrote:


I know, and would be happy to tell you, but 90 percent of the time I'm just talking to myself.

 emoticon



That reply was intended-for and directed-to member uV. emoticon

4/15/2013, 7:41 am Link to this post Send PM to Chipmunk Whisperer
 
Chipmunk Whisperer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: 03894
Posts: 4068
Reply | Quote
Re: The 1938 Hurricane...


"The Cage":

Cage, a small cottage used by Mr. Bentley as a study (currently, incorporated into the Kessler home)

"Now, The Rest of the Story":

A little later Charles and Andy appeared, and we all set to work to clear the Pinehurst road with axes and cross-cut saws. This was completed by noon and a little later the gang of town workers had cut a hole large enough for one car to go through on Forest Road. It was a relief to be able to drive to town again.

Wolfeboro received no papers or mail and as almost all wires were cut the town had no lights or phone service outside the limits. We spent the rest of the day clearing the road and checking damage. We found that the buildings of the camp had escaped serious injury and that most of the tent platforms were only slightly hurt; upturned roots had boosted the steps off the Doctor’s cabin, and Senior 6 was high in the air from the same reason. There were several trees resting against the tutoring cabin but it seemed undamaged.


September 23 – Friday Charlie Lord was fortunate today in securing Ivan Piper and his team of horses. This morning was spent clearing the logs out of the roadways. Two boys, Lloyd Morgan and George Corson reported for work in the afternoon, were given jobs. The first attempt at clearing logs, limbing and piling was made in the Senior Camp and around the Meserve tutoring cabin. Brad and I received our first initiation to the use of a peavey!

September 24 – Saturday This morning the ‘gang’ worked at Pinehurst and took down a ninety foot pine that looked dangerous. Another pine had come down close to it and it had limbed the branches off clean on one side. Young Charlie and Andy cut the tree and it fell, as hoped, between the Cage and Pinehurst.


The 25th, Sunday We rested and played some golf at Russell Cottages. All the next week the same crew worked in the woods, cutting logs, limbing trees, piling logs in several places throughout the camp. The men are now getting used to the work and are covering ground fast, although no attempt is made to clear stumps, brush or hard wood. Mr. Bentley has been dickering with Oscar York for the use of his mill, and also with one or two men who have portable mills. It seems probable that we shall use Oscar’s mill, although he has a reputation of being pretty unreliable.

The trees about the wharf, in the Senior camp, around Meserve cottage, in Cabintown, and at the foot of the hill are mostly down. Rough estimates place the footage at 30,000 and perhaps more. Most of the trees are small but there are enough large ones to make into lumber.


On Saturday, October 1st Brad and I left for Waterville, Maine to see Tufts play Colby in football. It was a cold, cloudy day, and the game was uninteresting. We noticed storm damage on the trip over but it seems that the storm let up a good deal the further east we went. On the way back we stopped at the Eastland in Portland and had a grand meal.

Sunday, October 2nd I stayed around the camp, cut some of the fallen birches and drove to Conway for dinner at Mrs. Perkins.

Monday, October 3rd, a new man, Walter Clifford was added to the woods crew and the week was largely spent still cutting and trimming logs. Wednesday, all but four of the crew laid off for their annual ‘Fair’ day and went to the Fryeburg Fair. Brad and I also went along and had an interesting time. Because of the work of Ivan’s team of horses during the week, we were even more interested in the ‘pulling’ contests at the fair. I tried my hand at the trotting races, cleared expenses for the day, and we returned. Brad left Friday for Boston and Middletown, Connecticut, to see his college friends and to talk the Wyanoke booklet over with Wayne Davis. During these last two weeks Brad and I have both devoted part of our time to work in the office.

Sunday, October 9th I stayed at camp, did odd jobs in the morning and in the afternoon talked cabin plans with Mr. Bentley. He has had several conferences with Oscar York this week and it turns out that we are to use his mill.

York has no money, the sheriff has posted his mill, but a dicker has been made whereby we will staff the mill and we will pay Oscar $5 a day for his services and for the use of the mill. Oscar is an unreasonable ‘white trash’ and whenever plans are talked over he draws into a hot argument. He has to have his own way about doing everything. It seems that Jones, the caretaker for the Hopewells, has a prior agreement with Oscar that he saws out a schedule of lumber before starting any other work. What this agreement is as far as compensation no one seems to say but more lumber is involved as there has been between thirty and forty thousand feet of logs trucked from the Hopewells to the mill already. My guess is that Hopewell doesn’t want the logs, that Jones wants to build a cabin, that the log belong to Oscar, for cutting out the small lumber schedule for the cabin. Our plan is that we shall staff the mill, cut out Oscar’s schedule for Jones, and take the mill wages out of Oscar’s pay for the time involved.

At the Fair last week Charlie Lord located a sawyer who came this afternoon to look at the mill and ready to start work tomorrow. Charlie, the sawyer, whose name is Earl Harriman, his helper, a little Frenchman names Jean Estes, Mr. Bentley and I had a conference late this afternoon. Work will start tomorrow.


Monday, October 10th The mill actually sawed its first log at 9:30 a.m. Oscar is as unreliable and unreasonable as ever – when the mill did start it would keep stopping as the water injector as not large enough to keep the boiler full.

The sawyer left at night for Fryeburg to get one from his mill. This boiler, by the way, came out of the old Governor Endicott.

The staff at the mill consisted of Harriman, sawyer, Estes, his assistant, young Charlie, Andy, York and his assistant, Brown. At the camp lumbering operations have continued. Kirkland, and his team of horses is in action now and a boom is under way at the camp-cookery site.

Tuesday, October 11th It was after ten today before the mill started going but before the day was out the Jones schedule was complete. When the men had this almost done Mr. Bentley and Oscar had another argument. The man is unreasonable and for some reason wants only the most excellent lumber from the cuts to go to Jones and this means the sawing out of a larger amount than would be necessary to fulfill the agreement. However, it is finally out and Jones has had a truck call for the part of it not planed. The same crew worked at the mill and at camp. Another boom is now under construction at the Carry, mostly hard pine.

Wednesday, October 12th With Jones schedule out the mill was ready for our logs but it took Oscar all morning to bring the boom up. I joined the crew today and we spent the morning clearing a runway for our truck and dragging away the boom which was blocking the whole end of the Cove near the mill. This was hard work. Each day I learn more of this type of work and each day is easier as I discover the easier way of doing hard lifting, and so forth.
5/21/2013, 9:54 am Link to this post Send PM to Chipmunk Whisperer
 
Chipmunk Whisperer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Global user

Location: 03894
Posts: 4068
Reply | Quote
Re: The 1938 Hurricane...The Last Page...


Mr. Bentley, Oscar, the old boat, Columbia, and the boom arrived and was put in place just before 11:30 lunch. In the afternoon we started sawing and managed to get out perhaps 1500 feet of lumber. This Andy trucked to the camp and I took his post at the winch, dragging logs from the lake and putting them on the brough for the sawyer. Perhaps tomorrow the mill will get underway properly.

Thursday, October 13th We have had excellent weather for this logging work. There has been but one day since the storm when we have had rain and that came in the afternoon so that the men have been able to do their job uninterrupted. Brad

came back yesterday and this morning he joined the crew.

The saw started up exactly at seven a.m. and all the crew were there and it has worked well all day. Over five thousand feet have gone out now and after work Mr. Bentley had Nat Goodhue take the second boom up and put it in place.

I have been working again on the brough and we have had some difficulty in keeping up with the sawyer, as many of this first boom of logs are small and have to be cut after they are on the runway. Andy slips over from his loading job every now and then and gives us a hand. In line at the mill now we have Corson and myself, the sawyer’s helper, sawyer, Charlie pulling lumber off the saw, passing on to Brad who tosses it to the platform, and Andy who loads up the truck. Oscar works keeping the fires going and his helper Brown has been paddling around all day in a boat trying to push a few logs towards the slip.


Oscar got along pretty well today but was upset when Brad gave him a few orders late in the afternoon. Oscar is a nervous type and I have not tried to give any directions to these men at all, especially Oscar. There is one thing that these men resent and that is too many bosses. It would be better if the sawyer handled the crew, including Brad and myself, and if we figured only when some decision had to be made concerning the lumber and camp.

We are sawing this lumber just about as it best fits the log and not running to a close schedule for cabins. Making sure, however, that enough dimension stock is cut for rafters, posts, and so forth.

The sawyer is quite a character, a fairly young man. He lives on the Saco River, and has four children, three boys and a girl. The oldest is eleven and two of his children were born in Lumber camps. He has two mills of his own, one in Maine and the other in Conway. He is a large man and pays close attention to all the details of sawing and to the safety of everyone concerned.

I can see why he wanted his own ‘helper’. Estes is a small man, has very little to say, and stands idle by the carriage a good deal of the time. When he works, adding on a log, or turning one he makes just the right motions and doesn’t waste a second. He, with the sawyer, make a good team.

October 14th, Friday The mill was late in starting again this morning. The saw had to be sharpened and Andy and I moved the boom (Which Nat Goodhue and Mr. Bentley brought up last night) to the old one. When it did start it worked fairly well during the morning and almost without interruption all afternoon. More lumber was produced today than any other so far this week.

We had some good sized logs today and most of them were properly cut. This made it easier for Corson and myself as we were well able to keep the brough full for the sawyer. We had one huge log that took us twenty minutes to land in position for the carriage. This was turned into some fine square edged boards. Andy carried six truck loads of lumber to be stacked at the north end of the ball field.

Only Charlie Lord and Pete Grenier were working at camp today as Ivan Piper and Hugh Kirkland and their teams had to be elsewhere. Morgan stacked lumber.

I think the reason the mill worked so well this afternoon and late morning was that Oscar disappeared and didn’t show up for several hours. Young Charlie fired and for once we had plenty of steam and power.

October 15th, Saturday The mill worked off and on all day, mostly off but several loads of lumber were turned out.

October 16th, Sunday Oscar’s wife telephoned me in the early afternoon and said that Oscar wanted to see Mr. Bentley at the mill. Mr. Bentley was in the mountains so I went down. Oscar wanted to know why he didn’t receive any money Saturday night. As carefully as I could I explained that the first two days sawing were to be deducted from his salary and that since the payroll amounted to $39 for those two days, and since he only worked four days for us, then he owed us $19. This didn’t seem to set very well. Had no argument at the time but merely explained my understanding of the arrangement and he didn’t deny it.

October 17th, Monday This morning when we appeared Oscar was determined that the mill would not start. Repeated arguments with all of us during which his only point was that he wasn’t going to work for nothing, that he’d agreed to no such arrangement. Three times the men were called away and it was settled that the mill operations were off. We even started to tie up our boom of logs. Finally Mr. Bentley said that he would pay Oscar for his work last week and would take the $39 in logs. This was not entirely agreed on but it seemed to give Oscar something to think about for the moment.

However, the fire box had to be rebuilt and it was discovered that York had taken the small Locomobile steam motor which runs the steam carriage home with him and it was not until noon that this was replaced, that the fire box was ready and sawing started. Oscar disappeared in the afternoon, Charlie stoked, and a good run was made for the rest of the day.

October 18th, Tuesday Oscar didn’t appear all day and we had a good run – probably seven or eight thousand feet of finished lumber – cut half of the logs in the boom and for the moment it looks as if things were going to hum along O.K.

October 19th, Wednesday Mill operations were ready to start, steam was up when Brad and I arrived at seven. Oscar was there and said the mill was not going to start, that this was final and that he wouldn’t listen to any more ‘propositions’. Brad went down to see his father and came back with the proposition that he give Oscar $15 cash and that the $19 would be written off for the use of the mill the rest of the week, and that at the end of the week Oscar would receive $15 more – the only stipulation being that he stay away from the mill during this time. No go – Oscar blew up and it was evident that he wasn’t going to listen to reason at all – Again he had removed the carriage motor. We boomed the logs and cleared out and felt very relieved. Now we will start to haul logs to Moore’s mill in Wolfeboro below the hospital.

October 20th, Thursday Elliot’s trucks have been hauling logs all day and starting this noon young Charlie and Andy began bringing back finished lumber from the Moore mill. This is a relief. We are probably paying $12 a day for trucking but we are getting the lumber a lot cheaper than at Oscar’s and without the worry and concern. This tapers things off a bit and I hope we are through with the Cove mill.


      ---The End---

5/21/2013, 9:57 am Link to this post Send PM to Chipmunk Whisperer
 


Add a reply





You are not logged in (login)